Category Archives: Faculty

Cattle tick, handling demonstrations featured at 47th South Texas Cow-Calf Clinic

by Blair Fannin, Texas A&M AgriLife Communications BRENHAM – Ranchers working cattle this fall and winter, or surveying pastures and wildlife, need to be mindful of ticks harboring on livestock and forage habitats. Dr. Pete Teel, Texas A&M AgriLife Research entomologist in College Station, recently gave a tick update at the 47th South Texas Cow-Calf Clinic in Brenham. Teel discussed a variety of ticks common to Texas, including those that have not entered the Lone Star state and pose potential health consequences not just for cattle, but for… Read More →

Professor Named 2018 TAMU Presidential Impact Fellow

COLLEGE STATION, Texas–The Department of Entomology would like to congratulate Dr. Zach Adelman for being named a Texas A&M University Presidential Impact Fellow. Adelman was among a total of 21 faculty members from the University’s 16 colleges, two branch campuses, and its libraries, who were honored during a special ceremony in the Bethancourt Ballroom at the Memorial Student Center on October 25. Following earlier work on the generation of mosquitoes resistant to viral pathogens, Adelman’s research has more recently focused on the development of novel gene editing/gene replacement… Read More →

Vargo Quoted in National Newspaper Article on Termite Research

Professor and Endowed Chair for Urban and Structural Entomology Dr. Edward Vargo was interviewed in a recent New York Times article on the discovery of all-female termite societies in Japan. Such colonies are produced without sexual reproduction. Vargo was quoted in the article saying that determining how and why certain colonies evolved asexuality might yield insights into the purpose of sex and sexual reproduction. Read the article here: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/28/science/termites-colonies-males.html

Professor Speaks on Fire Ant Research at International Conference

Dr. Patricia Pietrantonio, professor of Entomology at Texas A&M University, was the State-of-the-Art Speaker at the 29th Conference of European Comparative Endocrinologists (CECE), in August in Glasgow, Scotland. Held every two years, the purpose of the CECE meeting is to share new ideas and network with other researchers interested in the field of endocrinology. Pietrantonio’s presentation was during the “Omics and the Physiology of Insect Neuropeptides” section. Pietrantonio was invited by Professor Shireen Davis (University of Glasgow), the coordinator for nEUROSTRESSPEP. This Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme… Read More →

Rise of the grasshoppers: New analysis redraws evolutionary tree for major insect family

Grasshoppers are one of the most ubiquitous groups of insects in the world, found everywhere from grasslands to tropical rainforests to isolated mountain ranges to sandy deserts. And now, thanks to a decade-long analysis of grasshoppers’ genetic relationships, scientists have the clearest picture yet of the evolutionary pathways grasshoppers have followed to attain such diversity–and the findings put the birthplace of the broadest lineage of grasshoppers in South America, not Africa, as previously thought. These findings were published in the latest issue of Insect Systematics and Diversity. Led… Read More →

Entomologists, Extension Specialists Learn Latest Research at National Conference on Urban Entomology

Several members from the Department of Entomology joined more than 200 entomologists to share their research during the 2018 National Conference of Urban Entomology and Invasive Pest Ant Conference in May at the Embassy Suites in Cary, North Carolina. The four-day-long conference helps to bring urban and medical entomologists, pest control specialists, and members of the pest control industry together in a common setting to share information and search for new and innovative ways to help control pests that threaten people’s homes and health. During the conference, several… Read More →

Texas A&M scientist is among team to prove royalty among termites

by Steve Byrns, Texas A&M AgriLife Communications COLLEGE STATION – Termites! Just the insects’ common name can strike fear in the hearts of most any homeowner, but a recently published work could go a long way in quelling some of those fears, said one of the authors. Dr. Ed Vargo, Endowed Chair in Urban and Structural Entomology at Texas A&M University, College Station, is among a team of scientists who recently published “Identification of a Queen and King Recognition Pheromone in the Subterranean Termite Reticulitermes flavipes,” in the… Read More →

Teel Receives TAMUS Regents Professor Award

The Department of Entomology would like to congratulate Dr. Pete Teel as he received Regents Professor Award from the Texas A&M System during a special recognition ceremony in February. Teel was one of 12 faculty members that were recognized during ceremonies held in the Bethancourt Ballroom by the TAMUS Board of Regents. The award is given to recognize those professors that have made exemplary contributions to the university and the people of Texas. Teel is currently Professor and Associate Department Head for Academic Programs in the Department and… Read More →

Texas A&M scientists synthesize historical tick models to help curb the pest globally

by Steve Byrns, Texas A&M AgriLife Communications COLLEGE STATION – The battle against fever ticks rages on, and a group of Texas A&M University and French National Institute for Agricultural Research scientists are doing their best to determine where the fray will head by synthesizing historical models for use in curbing the pest globally. Texas A&M’s departments of wildlife and fisheries sciences and entomology and the French institute have collaborated for a number of years to model systems approaches meant to address ecological and regulatory questions about fever… Read More →

Coates Uses Blog to Help Teach Scientific Method to Non-Science Majors

Since the course was created more than 20 years ago, the Entomology 322 Insects and Human Society has given insight into the diverse world of insects to all non-science and non-entomology majors at Texas A&M University. To help students better understand the Scientific Method and scientific writing, Instructional Associate Professor Dr. Craig Coates recently started using a popular insect and entomology blog to help his students to understand how scientists use the scientific method to solve problems and find discoveries in the field of entomology, as well as… Read More →