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Forrest Mitchell

Mitchell, Forrest
Forrest Mitchell
Professor and Research Project Leader
Office:
Stephenville
Email:
Phone:
254.968.4144
http://stephenville.tamu.edu/faculty-and-staff/dr-forrest-l-mitchell/
Undergraduate Education
B.S. Texas A&M University, 1977, Wildlife and Fisheries Science
Graduate Education
PhD. Louisiana State University, 1985, Entomology
M.S. Texas A&M University, 1980, Entomology

Professional Objectives

To identify and implement low input, sustainable solutions to problems related to entomology, especially insect transmitted plant diseases, and the use of insect pathogens for management of pest species.

History

  • Research Assistant, Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, January 1978 – August 1980.
  • Research Assistant, Department of Entomology, Louisiana State University, September 1980 – June 1984.
  • Research Associate, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, July 1984 – August 1986.
  • Assistant Research Scientist, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, September 1986 – October 1991.
  • Assistant Professor, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, November 1991 – September 1997.
  • Associate Professor, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, September 1997 – Present.
  • Adjunct Professor, Department of Biology, Tarleton State University, 1990 – Present.

Research Emphasis:

  • Insect-microbe interactions in agroecosystems, including insect transmitted plant diseases and insect pathogens.
  • Wetland research, focusing on the Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies).

Current Work:

  • Pierce’s disease of grape is caused by an insect transmitted bacterium and is the limiting factor to grape and wine production in Texas. Our program researches the underlying causes of the problem and seeks to identify the least environmentally disruptive means of management.
  • A protozoan parasite of the red imported fire ant has spread throughout the eastern half of the state and is now pervasive in fire ant populations. Research into using this pathogen as a tool for managing fire ants is ongoing.
  • Cucurbit yellow vine disease, an insect transmitted bacterium, is being investigated for management by means of a trap crop technique that lures the vector insect out of the melon fields and into buffer rows of squash.
  • The Digital Dragonfly Project was initiated in 1996 and the supporting web sites displaying high quality images and scans of dragonflies and damselflies have been well received.

Peer-reviewed, Refereed Journal Articles (Boldfacing indicates a graduate student or postdoctoral associate)

  • Mitchell, F.L., and J.L. Lasswell. (2004) Population characteristics of the dragonfly Pantala flavescens colonizing small ponds constructed for water quality research. Southwestern Entomol. In press.
  • Pair, S.D., B.D. Bruton, F.L. Mitchell, J. Fletcher, A.D. Wayadande, and U. Melcher. (2004) Overwintering squash bugs harbor and transmit the causal agent of cucurbit yellow vine disease. Journal of Economic Entomology 97(1): 74-78.
  • Mitchell, F. L. and A. Knutson. 2004. Investigation of red imported fire ant damage to peanut. Southwestern Entomologist 29(1): 13-21.
  • Milks, M.L., Y.Y. Sokolova, I.A. Isakova, J.R. Fuxa, F.L. Mitchell, K.F. Snowden and S.B. Vinson. (2004). Comparative effectiveness of light-microscopic techniques and PCR in detecting Thelohania solenopsae infections in red imported fire ant. Journal of Eukaryotic Biology 51(2): 187-191.
  • Rascoe, J., M. Berg, U. Melcher, F.L. Mitchell, B.D. Bruton, S. Pair, and J. Fletcher. (2003). Characterization of Serratia isolates associated with cucurbit yellow vine disease. Phytopathology 93(10): 1233-1239.
  • Chen, J. S., K. Snowden, F. Mitchell, J. Sokolova, J. Fuxa and S. B. Vinson. 2004. Sources of spores for possible horizontal transmission of Thelohania solenopsae (Microsporida: Thelohaniidae) in the red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta. J. Invertebrate Pathology 85:139-145.
  • Zhang, Q., R. Weyant, U. Melcher, B.D. Bruton, S.D. Pair, F.L. Mitchell, and J. Fletcher. (2003) Genotyping of Serratia marcescens strains associated with cucurbit yellow vine disease. Phytopathology 93(10): 1240-1246.
  • Bruton, B.D., F.L. Mitchell, J. Fletcher, S.D. Pair, A. Wayadande, U. Melcher, J. Brady, B. Bextine, and T. Popham. (2003)Serratia marcescens, a phloem colonizing, squash bug transmitted bacterium is the causal agent of cucurbit yellow vine disease. Plant Dis. 87(8): 937-944.
  • Armstrong, J.S., G.C. Kraemer, and F.L. Mitchell. (2001) Thrips species associated with west Texas peanut. Southwestern Entomologist 26(4):345-352.
  • Bextine, B ., A. Wayadande, B.D. Bruton, S.D. Pair, F.L. Mitchell and J. Fletcher. (2001) Effect of insect exclusion on incidence of yellow vine disease in squash. Plant Disease 85(8): 875-878.